Keywords

Keywords


List Category Keyword Definition Artefact
count
  Davis, Captain James Whaling authority, second Antarctic criuse.    
  Eitel, Conrad Constatine Secretary AAE, second Antarctic cruise. Later changed his name to Conrad Lambert.    
Antarctic Protected Area Antarctic Historic Site and Monument   Antarctic Historic Site and Monument Adoption: ATCM Recommendation I-9 (1961), Recommendation V-4 (1968). Scope: "Tombs, buildings or objects of historic interest."    
Antarctic Protected Area Antarctic Specially Managed Area   Antarctic Specially Managed Area Adoption: Madrid Protocol, Annex V: Area Protection and Management, Article 4 (1991). Scope: "Areas where activities pose risks of mutual or cumulative environmental impacts."    
Antarctic Protected Area Antarctic Specially Protected Area   Antarctic Specially Protected Area Adoption: Madrid Protocol Annex V: Area Protection and Management, Article 3 (1991). Scope: "Any area, including any marine area, may be designated ... to protect outstanding environmental, scientific, historic, aesthetic or wilderness values, any combination of those values, or ongoing or planned scientific research."    
Artefact Type   Category 5: Tools & Equipment for Science & Technology: Field Equipment For non-scientific and non-transportation equipment such as sleeping bags, tents.    
Artefact Type   Unknown   1
Artefact Type Category 1: Structures   Building An artefact originally created primarily to provide or define a space with a controllable climate - usually through enclosure - for human activities. This classification may include permanent structures, such as garages or office buildings, or portable structures, such as tents. This classification includes most man-made structures. Houses, barns, warehouses, train stations, and jails are all primarily intended to provide spaces that can be kept warm or cool and dry. Architectural samples integral to buildings, such as wall sections or roof sections should be catalogued in this classification as parts of buildings. Separable, distinct and interchangeable components, such as doorknobs or window sashes, should be classified as "Building Components."   130
Artefact Type Category 1: Structures   Building Component An artefact originally created as a separate, distinct and generally interchangeable structural or decorative part of a building (though such artefacts - hinges, for example, - can be used in artefacts besides buildings, such as gates or tables). Though building components are distinct objects, they function as parts of larger structures rather than as independent units. This classification includes such things as mantels and window frames. Excluded from this classification are parts of buildings or other structures that lack distinctiveness or interchangeability, such as roofs, chimneys, or joists. Also excluded from this classification are parts of buildings that are not integral parts of the structure, such as furnishings, lighting devices, and plumbing fixtures , all of which are listed in the Furnishings category.   280
Artefact Type Category 1: Structures   Building Fragment   26
Artefact Type Category 1: Structures   Building Fragments: Tents and Camping   1
Artefact Type Category 1: Structures   Building Tents and Camping   13
Artefact Type Category 1: Structures   Category 1: Structures Artefacts originally created to define space for human activities or to be used as components of space defining artefacts.   1
Artefact Type Category 1: Structures   Other Structure An artefact originally created primarily to modify the environment or landscape or to define a space for some reason besides climate control. This classification includes dams, mines, and bridges. Structures, such as sports complexes that are primarily intended to provide controlled access and convenient seating should be placed in this classification. Some other structures may have climate controlled spaces, such as the space under dome in a stadium or the generating room of a hydroelectric dam, but these spaces serve a secondary role to the function of the structures.   13
Artefact Type Category 1: Structures   Site Feature An artefact originally created as distinct element that is associated with a site, a building, or other structure. Rather than functioning simply as a part of a larger structure, a site feature is an independent entity that complements other structures. This classification includes such things as bird-baths, flagpoles, gates and fences.   1
Artefact Type Category 1: Structures   Unclassified Structure   4
Artefact Type Category 1: Structures: Buildings: Station   station building, An artefact originally created primarily to provide or define a space with a controllable climate - usually through enclosure - for human activities. This classification may include permanent structures, such as garages or office buildings, or portable structures, such as tents. This classification includes most man-made structures. Houses, barns, warehouses, train stations, and jails are all primarily intended to provide spaces that can be kept warm or cool and dry. Architectural samples integral to buildings, such as wall sections or roof sections should be catalogued in this classification as parts of buildings. Separable, distinct and interchangeable components, such as doorknobs or window sashes, should be classified as "Building Components." Station: Any building located at an Antarctic station.   1
Artefact Type Category 10: Unclassifiable Artefacts   Artefact Remnant A segment or incomplete part of an artefact originally created to fulfil a purpose that cannot be determined or inferred from the fragment.   94
Artefact Type Category 10: Unclassifiable Artefacts   Function Unknown An artefact originally created to serve an unknown purpose   59
Artefact Type Category 10: Unclassifiable Artefacts   Multiple Use Artefact An artefact originally created to serve a variety of purposes that extend beyond the range of one classification. Tools that have multiple attachments that enable them to serve a range of functions fall into this classification, along with hybrid tools that are made of several disparate parts that are used together to perform a particular function, such as mending fences.   213
Artefact Type Category 10: Unclassifiable Artefacts   Unclassifiable Artefacts Artefacts created to serve a purpose that cannot be identified at the time the object is catalogued.   37
Artefact Type Category 2: Building Furnishings   Bedding An artefact originally created to be used on a bed or in association with sleeping.   6
Artefact Type Category 2: Building Furnishings   Category 2: Building Furnishings Artefacts originally created to facilitate human activity and to provide for physical need s of people generally by offering comfort, convenience or protection. Clothing is excluded from this classification as it addresses only the needs of a specific individual. Furnishings are not artefacts used as active agents in other processes, such as artefacts used as tools or equipment; they passively enable human activity.    
Artefact Type Category 2: Building Furnishings   Floor Covering An artefact originally created to answer the physical requirements and comforts of people in their living and work spaces. This classification includes outdoor furniture, desks, tables, beds, and chairs, but excludes appliances or tools, such as washing machines or ladders.   1
Artefact Type Category 2: Building Furnishings   Furniture An artefact originally created as portable or temporary covering for the floor of a building. This classification includes rugs and carpeting but not permanently attached tile or linoleum, which are included in the "Building Component" classification.   9
Artefact Type Category 2: Building Furnishings   Household Accessory An artefact originally created to be placed in or around a building for the convenience of people to enhance, complement or facilitate the maintenance of their environment. This classification includes small furnishings, such as soap dishes and spittoons, special household containers, such as vases and wastebaskets, and objects that protect furniture, such as antimacassars and table covers. The classification does not include artefacts intended primarily to communicate - they are classified as "Art" in Communications Artefacts - nor does it include devices used in a productive housekeeping activity, such as cooking maintenance.   44
Artefact Type Category 2: Building Furnishings   Lighting Device An artefact originally created to provide illumination. This classification includes lighting accessories, such as candlesnuffers or wick trimmers; general purpose portable lighting devices, such as kerosene lanterns; and specialised fixtures, such as streetlamps and theatre lighting devices.   46
Artefact Type Category 2: Building Furnishings   Plumbing Fixture An artefact originally created to be attached as an integral component to water and sewer lines, often within a building. Portable objects that serve comparable purposes are listed as "Household Accessories." Pipes and pipe fittings are "building Components" not "Plumbing Fixtures."   1
Artefact Type Category 2: Building Furnishings   Temperature Control Device An artefact originally created to enable people to control the temperature of their immediate environment according to their needs. This classification does not include devices to control temperature for purposes other than human comfort, as is the case with bake ovens and kilns, nor does it include relatively permanent structural parts of a building, such as fireplaces or flues.   52
Artefact Type Category 2: Building Furnishings   Window or Door Covering An artefact originally created to cover or adorn a window, door, or doorway. This classification does not include relatively permanent structural parts of buildings that are "Building Components," such as doors or window sashes.   1
Artefact Type Category 3: Personal Artefacts   Adornment An artefact originally created to be worn on the human body or on clothing for ornamentation rather than for protection or simply as a body covering. Adornment lacks the communicative aspect of objects in the Personal Symbol" classification and it is more decorative than those listed in the "Personal Gear" classification.    
Artefact Type Category 3: Personal Artefacts   Category 3 : Personal Artefacts Artefacts originally created to serve the personal needs of an individual as clothing, adornment, body protection, or an aid for grooming   10
Artefact Type Category 3: Personal Artefacts   Clothing An artefact originally created as a covering for the human body. This classification includes underwear, outerwear, headwear, footwear, and also accessories, such as belts and cuff links.   22
Artefact Type Category 3: Personal Artefacts   Clothing - Accessory An artefact created originally to be used in association with clothing, such as a belt or a cuff link. Accessories include artefacts that are worn, such as ascots, as well as those that are used for minor care of clothing, such as shoe polish applicators.   13
Artefact Type Category 3: Personal Artefacts   Clothing - Footwear Clothing and other protective items that are worn on the feet for protection or cover.   23
Artefact Type Category 3: Personal Artefacts   Clothing - Headwear Clothing that protects the head.   5
Artefact Type Category 3: Personal Artefacts   Clothing - Outerwear Clothing that is worn on the body over undergarments or as an exterior layer of dress.   40
Artefact Type Category 3: Personal Artefacts   Clothing - Underwear Clothing that is worn beneath outerwear to protect or cover the body. Underwear is the layer of clothing that is closest to the skin.   12
Artefact Type Category 3: Personal Artefacts   Personal Gear An artefact originally created to be used by an individual as a personal carrying device, such as a wallet or a knapsack; as a protective apparatus, such as an umbrella or goggles; or as personal smoking equipment and supplies, such as a pipe.   13
Artefact Type Category 3: Personal Artefacts   Toilet Article An artefact originally created to be used for personal care, hygiene or grooming.   15
Artefact Type Category 4. Tools and Equipment for materials   Food nutrition a substance used or capable of being used as nutrient for humans or animals. Keyword added by Michelle Berry 25 June 2009   28
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Agricultural T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for farming or gardening. This classification includes implements used in planting, tending, harvesting, and storing crops and in processing food for animals but not food for humans (see "Food Processing T & E" ). This classification does not include tools and equipment used in caring for animals (see "Animal Husbandry T & E"), working with forest products (See "Forestry T & E"), or in preparing fibres and textiles from agricultural products (see "Textileworking T & E").   2
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Animal Husbandry T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for the care, breeding and study of animals. This classification includes instruments used in the practice of veterinary medicine, in the psychological study of animals, and in the care of animals, such as the tools a farrier uses to shoe animals. This classification excludes equipment used in processing animal products for human use (see "Food Processing T & E" or "Leather, Horn, Shellworking T & E" ). Also excluded are the tools of trades related to animal husbandry that are not used directly with animals, such as farrier's metal-working tools.   10
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Basket, Broom and Brush Making T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for fabricating objects out of fibrous materials that are generally coarser than those used for textiles. This sub-classification includes tools used for basket-making, broom-making, brush-making and thatching.    
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Category 4: Tools & Equipment for materials Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to manage, oversee, capture, harvest or collect resources and to transform or modify particular materials, both raw and processed. These artefacts are normally created in response to problems inherent in the materials themselves. Wood requires certain cutting devices, fish certain lures, food requires certain serving utensils.   7
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Fishing & Trapping T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for capturing aquatic and terrestrial animals by any means other than weaponry.   9
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Food Processing Tools and Equipment Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for the processing, storage and preparation of food and beverages for human consumption. This classification does not include tools for gathering, production or management of food materials.   21
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Food Service Tools and Equipment Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for the service, presentation, or consumption of food or beverage by humans   127
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Food T & E   118
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Forestry T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for cutting, handling, or processing timber or for harvesting forest crops, such as bark, sap, gum, resin or rubber. This classification does not include equipment for cartage, which is classified under "Transportation Artefacts," or for manufacturing products from wood, which is classified under "Woodworking T & E" or "Papermaking T & E."    
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Glass, Plastics, Clayworking T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for fabricating objects from homogeneous complex compounds, such as glass, clay, rubber, synthetic resins, plastics or waxes. This classification also includes the tools, equipment and supplies used for producing such homogeneous complex compounds. These compounds differ from other materials because they generally require elaborate processing at some point during their use. As compounds, they doffer from other processed materials, such as leather because they are not discrete units; they differ from aggregate materials, such as masonry, because of their homogeneity and their need for elaborate processing.   2
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Leather, Horn, Shellworking T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for processing materials that are animal in origin. This classification includes tools and equipment for processing furs or hides, for preparing leather, for fabricating leather products, for working shell, horn, bone and ivory, and tools for making things from quills or feathers, This classification also includes artefacts for processing materials that are the products of insects and bacteria.    
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Masonry and Stoneworking T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for working with natural stone or with aggregate materials, such as concrete, mortar, brick or plaster. This aggregate materials can be of natural or manufactured origin. They differ from materials related to "Glass, Plastics, clayworking T & E" because they lack the homogeneity and the need for complex processing of those materials.    
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Metalworking T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for casting, forging, machining or fabricating metals or metal products. This classification does not include tools, equipment and supplies used in mining or preliminary processing of ores listed under "Mining and Mineral Harvesting T & E."   2
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Mining and Mineral Harvesting Tools and Equipment Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for extracting materials in solid, liquid or gaseous state from the natural environment. This classification includes equipment used for underground and surface mines, quarries, oil and water wells, for prospecting, and for supplemental processing operations, such as milling, washing, cleaning or grading. It also includes tools for ice harvesting and salt harvesting.    
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Other T & E for Materials   9
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Painting T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for working with materials that mask large surfaces by depositing a residual film, such as a paint film, or by using adhesives to attach a thin covering, such as wallpaper or gold leaf to a surface. This classification includes tools, equipment, and supplies used in decorative, artistic, and protective applications. Excluded from this classification are tools and equipment that are used with thicker coatings, such as wood veneers or plastic laminates, and tools and equipment used for metal plating. Also excluded are tools and equipment associated with printing processes, such as ink knives and silk screens.    
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Textileworking T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for the preparation of materials made from fibres and the preparation of woven fabrics. Also included in this category are tools, equipment and supplies used for manufacturing objects from fibres and cloth. This classification includes tools specific to the preparation of fibres, such as hatchels and cotton gins, but excludes tools, such as sheep shears and cotton balers, that are related to sources of fibres.   10
Artefact Type Category 4: Tools & Equipment For Materials   Woodworking T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for the fabrication of objects from wood. This classification includes artefacts used with and to create physically modified wood by-products, such as plywood, chipboard and masonite. This classification excludes tools and equipment for making objects out of chemically modified wood by-products, such as paper, rayon or rubber.   102
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Acoustical T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for the study of sound and its effects on hearing. Artefacts listed under "Acoustical T & E" differ from those under "Sound Communication Equipment" in that the function of the former is to study sound, not to transmit and receive it. They differ from some related items in "Medical and Psychological T & E" in that the function of items in "Acoustical T & E" is to examine the nature and the effects of sound, not to diagnose or treat medical situations.    
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Armament - Accessory This sub-classification includes all accessories used for hunting, target-shooting, warfare or self-protection.    
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Armament - Ammunition This sub-classification includes all projectile-firing weapons that can be easily deployed by one person. It excludes ammunition, firearm accessories and crew-served heavy armament.    
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Armament - Bludgeon This sub-classification includes all armament that is designed to batter or crush by weight or momentum. It also includes arms, such as sling-shots, that propel missiles that are neither explosive or penetrating.    
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Armament - Edged This sub-classification includes all armament that is intended to cut or pierce by cutting. It includes edged weapons, such as bayonets that are accessories to firearms and tools, such as crossbows that launch edged weapons.    
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Armament - Firearm This sub-classification includes all ammunition for armament whether intended for particular weapons, such as BB's or cartridges, or intended to be deployed alone, such as missiles, or bombs.    
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Armament T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to be used for hunting, target shooting, warfare, or self-protection. This classification includes firearms, artillery, bladed weapons, and striking weapons. It does not include objects designed for transporting troops or supplies. For convenience, it is divided into several sub-classifications based on forms of weapons.    
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Astronomical T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to observe, measure and document objects and events outside the earth's atmosphere. Artefacts listed under "Astronomical T & E" differ from those under "Optical T & E" in that the former are not intended to address particular problems associated with vision. They differ from those under "Surveying and Navigational T & E" in that they are concerned with observation rather than with practical uses for such observation.   3
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Biological T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to observe, measure and document physiological or anatomical aspects of organisms for purposes other than diagnosis or treatment. Tools for diagnosis and treatment are classified under "Medical and Psychological T & E"; those for animals are under "Animal Husbandry T & E."   29
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Category 5: Tools and Equipment for Science and Technology Tools, equipment and supplies used for the observation of natural phenomena or to apply knowledge gained from such observation. Tools in this category tend to be made to enlarge or record our understanding of the world or to help express such understanding. The classifications in this category are related by virtue of the fact that they contain artefacts created to employ a particular body of knowledge. "Astronomical T & E" is a classification that lists those tools used to examine distant phenomena. "Timekeeping T & E" is a classification that lists those things that people have developed to measure time. "Maintenance T & E" is a classification that lists those tools developed in response to a body of knowledge about how to take care of things. These classifications are based, then, on knowledge rather than materials.   145
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Chemical T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for the study or manufacture of substances based upon their molecular composition, structure and properties. The study of atomic and subatomic particles is classified under "Nuclear Physics T & E"; the study of the interaction of objects under "Mechanical T & E."   15
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Electrical and Magnetic T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created observe, measure and document electrical and magnetic phenomena. This classification also includes tools, equipment and components used in the manufacture, installation and repair of electrical and electronic devices, such as electrician's pliers, or oscilloscopes. This classification does not include electrical or electronic devices created to serve other specific purposes, such as sound communication or data processing, nor does it include electrical motors or generators (See" Energy Production T & E").   19
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Energy Production T& E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to generate, convert or distribute energy or power.   8
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Field Equipment   77
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Geological T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to observe, measure and document geological phenomena. This classification includes geologist's picks and seismic measuring devices, but it excludes tools used for harvesting or mining rock or mineral materials.   3
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Maintenance T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for cleaning or laundering activities, whether carried on in a home or a public building, whether performed occasionally or as a business. This classification includes specialised tools used for the restoration and conservation of objects.    
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Mechanical T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for the study, measurement or utilisation of the static and dynamic properties of solids, liquids and gasses. This classification also includes general-purpose mechanical devices, such as tensiometers and pressure gauges, used to measure mechanical properties.   5
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Medical & Psychological T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for the examination, testing, diagnosis and treatment of humans. This classification includes dental tools, objects used for testing sight and hearing and objects used for psychological testing or treatment. It does not include objects used to study physical phenomena (see "Optical T & E, " "Acoustical T & E," "Biological T & E" and "Chemical T & E") or tools for veterinary medicine (see "Animal Husbandry T & E").   22
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Merchandising T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to facilitate or enable the exchange of goods and services. This classification includes those artefacts used to present goods, such as counters, as well as specific product packages. General product packages that are primarily intended for transporting goods rather than for marketing them are listed in the classification "Containers" in the " Distribution of Artefacts" category.   77
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Meteorological T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to observe, measure and document atmospheric phenomena.   12
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Nuclear Physics T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to study atomic structure and elementary particles as well as the physical properties of the universe.    
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Optical T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to observe, measure and record light. This classification includes commonly used equipment, such as binoculars and microscopes. It excludes specialised artefacts created for other scientific observation, such as visual acuity charts and telescopes that are used particularly for astronomy.   2
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Other T & E for Science and Technology   66
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Regulative & Protective T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for controlling the behaviour of people, providing security or protection for property and carrying out nonceremonial activities of a governmental organisation (including fire protection, police protection and voting).    
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Surveying and Navigational T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to determine the position of an observer relative to known reference points or to indicate the form and extent of a region, such as land surface. This classification includes instruments for taking linear and angular measurements. It excludes devices for making calculations (see "Data Processing T & E") or for recording data graphically (see "Drafting T & E"). This classification differs from "Astronomical T & E" in that the objects in this classification are used for applied purposes, not for scientific study.   60
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Thermal T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to observe, measure and document heat and its effects. Specialised artefacts created to serve specific purposes, such as a meteorological thermometer, are excluded from this classification   1
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Timekeeping T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for recording and measuring time. This classification does not include timekeeping artefacts created got specialised purposes, such as chronometers.   5
Artefact Type Category 5: Tools & Equipment For Science & Technology   Weights and Measures T& E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to observe, record and measure mass (weight) or physical dimensions, such as length, area and volume. This classification includes general-purpose measuring devices, such as precision balances or folding rules. It excludes artefacts created to measure time and to measure particular scientific data. Also excluded, are specialised measuring devices and gauges, such as sextants or carpenter's squares.   11
Artefact Type Category 6: Tools & Equipment For Communication   Category 6: Tools and Equipment for Communication Tools, equipment and supplies used to enable communication. This category includes those classifications for literal and abstract communication - "Printing T & E" and "Musical T & E." This category does not include things produced as communication, such as works of art and documents. These are the artefacts created by the tools of this category, and are listed in category 8, "Communication Artefacts."   3
Artefact Type Category 6: Tools & Equipment For Communication   Data Processing T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created for processing data by manual, mechanical, or electronic means. This classification includes numerical and wordprocessing devices, such as abacuses and digital computers; process-control devices, such as analog computers; and learning devices, such as teaching machines.    
Artefact Type Category 6: Tools & Equipment For Communication   Drafting T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to be used for precision drawing, such as T-squares or drafting tables. This classification includes instruments used to record surveying and navigational observations. It does not include general purpose writing or lettering tools.   6
Artefact Type Category 6: Tools & Equipment For Communication   Musical T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to produce musical sounds. This classification includes devices actively employed in musical performance. It excludes equipment that simply transmits sound as well as acoustical tools and equipment for studying sound.    
Artefact Type Category 6: Tools & Equipment For Communication   Other T & E for Communication   5
Artefact Type Category 6: Tools & Equipment For Communication   Photographic T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to capture a permanent visual image by optical and chemical means, such as a camera, a film processing tank, or an enlarger.   75
Artefact Type Category 6: Tools & Equipment For Communication   Printing T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to reproduce written, photographic or artistic material. This classification includes specialised tools, such as handpresses, engraver's blocks and photocopiers that are used for bookbinding, engraving, etching, lithography and silk-screening.   14
Artefact Type Category 6: Tools & Equipment For Communication   Sound Communication T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to amplify or store music, spoken words or other sounds that are meaningful for human communication.   22
Artefact Type Category 6: Tools & Equipment For Communication   Telecommunication T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to facilitate communicating at a distance, usually by means of electronic equipment. This classification includes the telephone, telegraph, radio and television.   42
Artefact Type Category 6: Tools & Equipment For Communication   Visual Communication T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to be used as a visual sign or signalling device or as a means of viewing photographic or other visual images.   43
Artefact Type Category 6: Tools & Equipment For Communication   Written Communication T & E Tools, equipment and supplies originally created to facilitate communication between people by means of written documents. This classification includes tools and supplies used for writing, such as pens, ink and paper. Excluded from this classification are artefacts produced by writing, such as letters and artefacts that are written upon but that were created for another purpose, such as postcards. These particular exclusions are both "Documentary Artefacts."   19
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Aerospace Transportation   6
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Aerospace Transportation - Accessory An artefact originally created as an accessory to be used in conjunction with the transportation of people or goods above the surface of the earth.   8
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Aerospace Transportation - Equipment An artefact originally created to transport people or goods above the surface of the earth.   7
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Category 7: Distribution and Transportation Artefacts Artefacts originally created to transport or distribute animate and inanimate things. This category also includes artefacts originally created to facilitate such transportation or as an adjunct to such transportation. This category includes propelled vehicles, such as automobiles and wheelbarrows, as well as containers that facilitate distribution. Because transportation equipment is complex and parts are often collected independently, sub-classifications for accessories are offered for some classifications.   3
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Container Artefacts originally created for packing, shipping or holding goods and commodities. Containers created for particular products and used for marketing and merchandising products are listed with "Merchandising T & E."   144
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Land Transportation   6
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Land Transportation - Animal-Powered An artefact, powered by animal energy, originally created to transport people or goods on land without restriction to a fixed route determined by a track or other guidance device.   36
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Land Transportation - Human-Powered An artefact, powered by human energy alone, originally created to transport people or goods on land without restriction to a fixed route determined by a track or other guidance device.   34
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Land Transportation - Motorised An artefact, powered by some kind of self-acting mechanism, such as a motor, originally created to transport people or goods on land without restriction to a fixed route determined by a track or other guidance device.   11
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Land Transportation - Accessory An artefact, originally created as an accessory used in the transportation of people or goods on land without restriction to a fixed route determined by a track or other guidance device.   17
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Rail Transportation    
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Rail Transportation - Accessory An artefact, originally created as an accessory used in the transportation or goods on or along a fixed route determined by a track or some similar device.   1
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Rail Transportation - Equipment An artefact, originally created as an accessory to the transportation of people or goods on or along a fixed route determined by a track or some similar device.    
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Water Transportation   8
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Water Transportation - Accessory An artefact, originally created as an accessory for the transportation of people or goods on or under water.   8
Artefact Type Category 7: Distribution & Transportation Artefacts   Water Transportation - Equipment An artefact, originally created to transport people or goods on or under water.   5
Artefact Type Category 8: Communication Artefacts   Advertising Medium An artefact originally created to call public attention to a product or service, or event and to elicit a specific response to products, services or events. Generally, the intended response is to urge people to acquire, use or participate in the product, service or event that is being advertised.   2
Artefact Type Category 8: Communication Artefacts   Art An artefact originally created for the expression and communication of ideas, values or attitudes through images, symbols and abstractions. It often reflects aesthetic pleasure or demonstrates creative skills and dexterity. Art can be uniquely created, or it can be produced in a medium that allows many duplicates to be made.   214
Artefact Type Category 8: Communication Artefacts   Category 8: Communication Artefacts Artefacts originally created as expressions of human thought. Communication artefacts comment on, interpret or enhance people's environments. Communication artefacts can function symbolically or literally. This category excludes the tools and equipment that are used to create communications artefacts.   18
Artefact Type Category 8: Communication Artefacts   Ceremonial Artefact Artefacts originally created for carrying on governmental, fraternal, religious or other organised and sanctioned societal activities. These artefacts are intended to evoke symbolise or express certain aspects of the traditions or heritage of a community or a group of people. Usually, they are associated with rituals or ceremonies. This classifications includes: (1) any religious artefact, such as communion cups and altar pieces (note, though, that personal devotional objects, such as religious medals and talismans are classified under "Personal Symbol"); (2) any object used in a ceremony concerned with major personal events or crises, such as birth, puberty, sickness or death, or concerned with community events or crises, such as harvest festivals or the need for rain; and (3) any object used in the ceremonial activities of a fraternity , lodge, club, governmental or military organisation, such as the pennant of a Girl Scout troop.   58
Artefact Type Category 8: Communication Artefacts   Documentary Artefact An artefact originally created to communicate information to people. Unlike "Advertising Media," "Documentary Artefacts" are not generally intended to elicit a specific response in regards to products, services or events. Instead, they present a point of view, an image or a set of ideas, often with the aim of enlightening or swaying the attitude of people. This classification includes documents and also artefacts displaying commemorative information on material other than paper, such as commemorative coins and souvenir plates.   117
Artefact Type Category 8: Communication Artefacts   Exchange Medium An artefact originally created to be used as a medium of exchange, such as coins, currency or shell money, or as a means of obtaining specific services, such as a postage stamp or a transportation token.   1
Artefact Type Category 8: Communication Artefacts   Personal Symbol An artefact originally created to communicate a particular personal belief, achievement, status or membership. This classification includes articles of adornment or clothing worn primarily for their symbolism, such as a fraternal ring, an academic gown or a crown. "Personal Symbols" differ from "Ceremonial Artefacts" in that they express individual ideas, not the ideas of a group.   2
Artefact Type Category 9: Recreational Artefacts   Category 9: Recreational Artefacts Artefacts originally created to be used as toys or to carry on the activities of sports, games, gambling or public entertainment.   21
Artefact Type Category 9: Recreational Artefacts   Game An artefact originally created for a competitive activity based upon chance, problem solving or calculation, rather than physical effort and conducted according to stated rules. This category also includes all forms of gambling devices.   4
Artefact Type Category 9: Recreational Artefacts   Public Entertainment Device An artefact originally created for the production of non-competitive spectator entertainment.    
Artefact Type Category 9: Recreational Artefacts   Recreational Device An artefact originally created for a participatory, usually non-competitive recreational activity other than an athletic game or exercise. This classification includes equipment for entertainment, such as a carousel, a pinball machine, a swing or a slide, whether such equipment is publicly or privately owned and whether or not a charge is associated with its use.   8
Artefact Type Category 9: Recreational Artefacts   Sports Equipment An artefact originally created for a physical activity that is often competitive. This classification includes equipment used in all forms of athletic games and exercises, including individual and team sports.   2
Commonwealth Heritage List Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion: A Processes The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance in the course, or pattern, of Australia's natural or cultural history.   50
Commonwealth Heritage List Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion: B Rarity - uncommon, rare or endangered The place has significant heritage value because of the place's possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of Australia's natural or cultural history.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion: C Potential information The place has significant heritage value because of the place's potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of Australia's natural or cultural history.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion: D Characterisitc Values - principal characteristics of natural or cultural places or environments The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of: (i) a class of Australia's natural or cultural places; or (ii) a class of Australia's natural or cultural environments.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion: E Aesthetic Charateristics The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance in exhibiting particular aesthetic characteristics valued by a community or cultural group.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion: F Technical or creative achievement The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical achievement at a particular period.   50
Commonwealth Heritage List Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion: G Social cultural or spiritual The place has significant heritage value because of the place's strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group for social, cultural or spiritual reasons.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion: H Significant people - association with person(s) The place has significant heritage value because of the place's special association with the life or works of a person, or group of persons, of importance in Australia's natural or cultural history.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Commonwealth heritage List   Criterion: I Indigenous tradition The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance as part of indigenous tradition.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Legal status   Assessed place The Council has completed the assessment of the place referred to it by the Minister.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Legal status   Destroyed place The place has been destroyed before being assessed or listed.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Legal status   Emergency listing The Minister has been satisfied that the place has one or more Commonwealth Heritage values and that any one or more of those values is under threat. He has by instrument published in the Gazette, included the place in the Commonwealth Heritage List. Such places are subsequently referred to the Council for assessment.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Legal status   Indicative place Data provided to or obtained by the Heritage Division has been entered into the database. However, a formal nomination has not been made and the Council has not received the data for assessment. The data in the place does not necessarily represent the views of the Council or the Minister.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Legal status   Ineligible place At some stage in the assessment process, but prior to listing, the place ceases to be in a Commonwealth area, or, if outside the Australian jurisdiction, is no longer owned or leased by the Commonwealth.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Legal status   Listed place The Council has sent an assessment to the Minister and the Minister has entered the place in the Commonwealth Heritage List. He does this by instrument published in the Gazette.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Legal status   Nominated place The Minister's delegate has received a nomination on the approved form and carried out an initial assessment on data adequacy. The nomination either will be or has been referred to the Council for assessment. The data will generally be that provided by the nominator, but will be updated during assessment. The significance or values attributed to the place are the views of the nominator and not necessarily those of either the Council or the Minister.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Legal status   Place not included The Council has sent an assessment to the Minister and the Minister has decided not to include the place in the Commonwealth Heritage List. This cecision will appear on the Internet with the reasons for the decision.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Legal status   Removed place Either the Minister " has removed the place from the CHL as the place is no longer in a Commonwealth area or, if the place is outside the Australian jurisdiction, the place is no longer owned or leased by the Commonwealth or a Commonwealth Agency; or " has removed the place because he is satisfied that the place no longer has any Commonwealth Heritage values; or " has decided that it is necessary to do so in the interests of Australia's defence or security.    
Commonwealth Heritage List Legal status   Within listed place - any values given in record for listed place This place is within the larger area entered in the Commonwealth Heritage List. Whilst the place has not been specifically assessed, it may have heritage values. Such values may be identified in the record for the encompassing area.    
Commonwealth Heritage Values Assessment Legal Status   Commonwealth Heritage Values Assessed The assessment of heritage values for inclusion in the Department of the Environment and Water Resources Heritage Register meets the requirements of regulations made under Part 15 Division 3A Subdivision D of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, and is presented in accordance with Regulation 10.03G(2) for entries in a departmental heritage register.    
Expedition   AAE Australasian Antarctic Expedition 1911-1914   544
Expedition   ANARE Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions   602
Expedition   BANZARE British, Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition 1929-1931 - visited Cape Denison 1931   9
Expedition   POST-ANARE All visits post-dating ANARE   12
Expedition Heard Island Sealers   PRE-AAE Those, generally unidentified sealers that operated on Heard Island in the late nineteenth century, approximately between 1855 1880.   25
Expeditioner   Bage, Lieutenant Edward Frederick Robert Astronomer, Assistant Magnetician and Recorder of Tides, 23 years of age, first year of AAE; Magnetician, second year of AAE   5
Expeditioner   Bechervaise, John   10
Expeditioner   Bewsher, Bill   2
Expeditioner   Bickerton, Francis Howard In charge of air tractor sledge, 22 years of age, first and second years of AAE   7
Expeditioner   Burton, Harry    
Expeditioner   Butling, Don ANARE Expeditioner, Wilkes, 1960, plumber. also built Aneata in 1960.    
Expeditioner   Close, John Henry Collinson Assistant Collector, 40 years of age, first year of AAE   2
Expeditioner   Collins, Neville Joseph (Gringo) Senior Diesel Mechanic, Wilkes, 1962   1
Expeditioner   Correll, Percy Edward Mechanic and Assistant Physicist, 19 years of age, first year of AAE   2
Expeditioner   Dean, Adrian Carpenter, Macquarie Island, 1959   1
Expeditioner   Dovers, George Western Base. Cartographer.   1
Expeditioner   Edgeworth David, Sir Tannatt William   1
Expeditioner   Flynn, Professor T. Flynn Hobart University, Biologist, second sub-Antarctic cruise. Despite many remnders from Mawson, Flynn did not write-up any of his material.    
Expeditioner   Hannam, Walter Henry Wireless Operator and Mechanic, 26 years of age, first year of AAE   4
Expeditioner   Harrisson, Charles T. Western Base. Biologist.    
Expeditioner   Hoadley, C. Archibald Western Base. Geologist.    
Expeditioner   Hodgeman, Alfred James Cartographer and Sketch Artist, 26 years of age, first and second years of AAE   3
Expeditioner   Hunter, John George Biologist, 23 years of age, first year of AAE   5
Expeditioner   Hurley, James Francis Official Photographer, 24 years of age, first year of AAE, BANZARE   69
Expeditioner   Jacka, Fred   1
Expeditioner   Jeffryes, Sydney N. Wireless Operator, 27 years of age, second year of AAE   2
Expeditioner   Jones, S. Evan Western Base. Medical Officer.    
Expeditioner   Kennedy, Alec L. Western Base. Magnetician.   1
Expeditioner   Kerry, Knowles    
Expeditioner   King, Peter, W.   4
Expeditioner   Kirkby, Sydney L.   2
Expeditioner   Laseron, Charles Francis Taxidermist and Biological Collector, 25 years of age, first year of AAE   2
Expeditioner   Law, Phillip Director of the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) 1949 - 1966.    
Expeditioner   Ledingham, Rod   2
Expeditioner   Lee, Reginald Thomas (Pat) Diesel mechanic, Mawson, 1957 and 1966   4
Expeditioner   Liddiard, Thomas   2
Expeditioner   Madigan, Cecil Thomas Meteorologist, 23 years of age, first and second years of AAE   6
Expeditioner   Mawson, Dr Douglas Expedition Leader, Geologist, 30 years of age, first and second years of AAE, BANZARE   107
Expeditioner   McCormack, Dave   6
Expeditioner   McKinnon, Graeme W.   5
Expeditioner   McLean, Dr Archibald Lang Chief Medical Officer and Bacteriologist, 26 years of age, first and second years of AAE   3
Expeditioner   Mertz, Dr Xavier In charge of Greenland dogs, 28 years of age, first year of AAE   4
Expeditioner   Moncur, Rex   1
Expeditioner   Moyes, Morton H. Western Base. Meteorologist.    
Expeditioner   Murphy, Herbert Dyce In charge of air expedition stores, 32 years of age, first year of AAE   2
Expeditioner   Ninnis, Lieutenant Belgrave E. S. In charge of Greenland dogs, 23 years of age, first year of AAE   5
Expeditioner   Stillwell, Frank Leslie Geologist, 23 years of age, first year of AAE   8
Expeditioner   Thomson, Robert Baden (Bob) Officer in Charge, Wilkes, 1962   1
Expeditioner   Tierney, Michael V. ANARE winterer, Casey 1978.   25
Expeditioner   Waite, E. R. Curator Canterbury Museum, Christchurch, Biologist, first sub-Antarctic cruise.    
Expeditioner   Waterschoot van der Gracht, J. Van. Landscape artist, second Antarctic cruise.    
Expeditioner   Watson, Andrew D. Western Base. Geologist.    
Expeditioner   Webb, Eric Norman Chief Magnetician, 22 years of age, first year of AAE.   6
Expeditioner   Whetter, Dr Leslie H. Surgeon, 29 years of age, first year of AAE.   2
Expeditioner   Wild, Frank

Western Base. Leader and sledgemaster.

Born in in Skelton, North Yorkshire, in 1873, Frank Wild first went to the Antarctic with Robert Scott in 1901 - the beginning of a 20-year Antarctic career that also included working under Shackleton and Mawson, often in the toughest of circumstances. Wild turned out to be the epitome of a polar explorer - practical, hard-working, loyal, reserved, unflappable - with an incomparable record of Antarctic experience on land and sea.

Frank Wild joined the British merchant service in 1889, travelling to South Africa, Asia and Australia, until joining the Royal Navy in 1900, in which he served aboard HMS Edinburgh and H.M.S. Vernon. The following year he joined Scott's National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, serving on an extended sledge journey that reached an altitude of 2700 metres. His experience won him selection by Ernest Shackleton to join the southern sledging party in the British Antarctic Expedition of 1907-1909, during which he ventured closer to the South Pole than anyone before.

Mawson got to know Wild during Shackleton¿s expedition, and saw him as one of the two essential members of the AAE (along with ship¿s master John Davis). He put Wild in charge of the `Western Party', which was to explore lands four hundred miles and more to the west of Cape Denison. Wild finally set up a base at the western end of the great Shackleton Ice Shelf, in the region first visited by the 1901 German Gauss expedition. The base was built on floating ice 27 kilometres from land.

This was Wild¿s first big opportunity to show his leadership ability, and he did not disappoint. Through a long winter and succeeding summer he and his six companions completed an arduous program of sledging to the east, west and south of their home on the floating ice shelf, mapping hundreds of miles of Queen Mary Land¿s coast and hinterland. They completed the work without fuss or rancour; Wild said at the end he would be happy to serve with the same team again.

He returned to England in time to join Shackleton again, this time on the epic `voyage¿ of the doomed Endurance, trapped and finally crushed by the ice of the Weddell Sea.

Having lost their ship, the men endured nearly five months on sea ice and stormy seas. Near the end of their icy journey, when it became clear his beloved sledge dogs would have to be disposed of, Wild himself took on the task of shooting them.

On finally reaching desolate Elephant Island in the South Shetlands, Shackleton decided to take five others to attempt a whaleboat journey to seek help from whalers at South Georgia. It was Wild whom he put in charge of the remaining 22 men in his expedition party. The castaways endured 138 days through winter and early spring

On returning to war-torn Europe, Wild took up a naval position that took him to Spitsbergen and Russia. During this assignment he met Vera Altman, the widow of a British official in Vladivostok, whom he was later to marry.

For a few years he tried tobacco farming in southern Africa, without much success. It was easy for him to agree to Shackleton¿s offer to venture once more into the Antarctic, on Shackleton's final voyage aboard Quest in the summer of 1921-1922. When 'the Boss' took ill and died, Wild took over command of the expedition, but in the absence of a clear brief from his former leader he lost the will to continue.

In 1923, he returned to South Africa with Vera, trying cotton farming and railway construction. But failing finances and marriage (ending in divorce in 1928) took their toll on his health. He was to marry again, but his financial difficulties continued. He supplemented a meagre income from bar-tending (interspersed with drinking bouts) and mining by giving lectures on his Antarctic adventures.

 
1
Expeditioner   Wilkins, Sir Hubert   3
Expeditioner   Woodberry, Barry D.   4
Materials   Bamboo    
Materials   Bamboo    
Materials   Paint - watercolour used in art.    
Materials   Asbestos cement Asbestos cement is also known as "fibro." It is a building material of whitish colour and uniform thickness with a smooth surface. The fibrous material used in its manufacture can often be seen embedded in the outer surface.   51
Materials   Ash Ash is the whitish or grey coloured residue from a fire    
Materials   Biological Material - Other   19
Materials   Biological Material - preserved bird A naturally freeze dried specimen, including, skeletal material, soft tissue and feathers.   10
Materials   Biological Material - preserved dog A naturally freeze dried specimen, including, skeletal material, soft tissue and fur.   20
Materials   Biological Material - preserved penguin A naturally freeze dried specimen, including, skeletal material, soft tissue and feathers.   12
Materials   Biological Material - preserved seal A naturally freeze dried specimen, including, skeletal material, soft tissue and fur.   24
Materials   Biological material - preserved sheep A naturally freeze dried specimen, including, skeletal material, soft tissue and feathers.    
Materials   Biological Material - preserved skua A naturally freeze dried specimen, including, skeletal material, soft tissue and feathers.   1
Materials   Bone Includes teeth, antler and horn as well as bones.   8
Materials   Bone - burnt The colour and patterning of the bone is dependant on whether the bone was wet or dry at the time of incineration and the temperature to which it was exposed.   3
Materials   Bone - butchered Evidence of butchery can be observed on bones as clean cuts through the bone or incised marks. Sometimes it is possible to identify the type of implement that was used, such as a saw.   1
Materials   Bone - other Includes all bone, including teeth, which lacks discernible physical evidence of working or butchery..   4
Materials   Bone - worked This category includes worked bone, ivory, horn and antler. Worked bone is frequently found in the form of handles (e.g. for cutlery), buttons and other ornaments. Worked bone can be distinguished from synthetic material by examination with a magnifying glass. It has a distinctive circular "grain."   3
Materials   Bristles This term is only used in association with animal bristle. Synthetic bristles are classified as "Plastic - Other."   3
Materials   Candle wax, wick   1
Materials   Cardboard   12
Materials   Ceramics - Earthenware - Architectural/Industrial   4
Materials   Ceramics - Earthenware - Other   2
Materials   Ceramics - Earthenware -Domestic Ceramics - Earthenware refers to all forms of non-vitreous opaque whiteware. The clay particles do not vitrify in earthenwares, and so the resulting wares are porous and often thick-sectioned, and coarse and grainy at a break (although fine, thin-sectioned earthenwares are also found). Domestic earthenware is invariably glazed due to the porous nature of the pieces. A good way of detecting earthenware is to touch the broken edge of a piece with the tongue - earthenware will have a grainy, sandpaper-like feel to it.   3
Materials   Ceramics - Other Ceramics -Other (specify) is used to describe a known ceramics type other than earthenware, stoneware or terracotta.   6
Materials   Ceramics - Porcelain - Architectural/Industrial    
Materials   Ceramics - Porcelain - Domestic Ceramics - Porcelain refers to all forms of porcelain (soft and hard paste) and bone china, i.e. types of vitreous whiteware. The body particles are completely vitrified during firing - any break in porcelain is, therefore, smooth and glass-like. Porcelain pieces are non-porous and often to some extent translucent, depending on the fineness of the of the piece. Porcelain pieces are usually glazed (clear) although ornamental pieces are occasionally unglazed. Domestic ware pieces are relatively fine and thin.   4
Materials   Ceramics - Porcelain - Other    
Materials   Ceramics - Stoneware - Architectural/Industrial   6
Materials   Ceramics - Stoneware - Domestic Ceramics - Stoneware refers to wares made of a vitreous opaque body, usually light brown or beige in colour. The clay particles in stoneware are completely vitrified during firing, thus producing a hard, non-porous ware, which is completely smooth at a break. Because it is non-porous, stoneware was frequently used for drinking vessels, containers for liquids, and for industrial pieces. Domestic stoneware is found glazed and unglazed (sometimes salt glazed, which gives a shiny, "orange peel" effect) and frequently features relief decoration (or is left undecorated)..   7
Materials   Ceramics - Stoneware - Other   1
Materials   Ceramics - Terracotta Ceramics - Terracotta usually have a rough unglazed clay body, which is often red or yellow in colour. Terracotta is extremely porous and usually found in the form of building materials and garden pieces.    
Materials   Ceramics - Unidentified Ceramics - Unidentified is used to describe objects of unknown or indiscernible ceramic type   2
Materials   Chemicals   1
Materials   Coal Coal is formed from carbonised vegetable material and is used as a substance for domestic heating and manufacturing.   2
Materials   Composite Object Composite objects are catalogued by describing all fabrics comprising the object.   59
Materials   Concrete Concrete is a building material made from a mixture of water, sand, stone and cement. It is extremely hard and heavy when set, and often coarse and grainy at a break.   50
Materials   Cork   29
Materials   Down   11
Materials   Feathers   2
Materials   Fibre - felt   15
Materials   Fibre - Other   15
Materials   Fibre - Textile All fibre categories refer to natural fibre only. These do not include wool, which has its own category. Synthetic fibres are classified as "Plastic - Other."   44
Materials   Fibre - Textile - Canvas   52
Materials   Fibre - Textile - Cotton   85
Materials   Fibre - Textile - Fibre pile/polar fleece   1
Materials   Fibre - Textile - Linen    
Materials   Fibre - Textile - Nylon/polyester   6
Materials   Fibre - Textile - Other   33
Materials   Fibre - Thread/String/Cord/Rope   118
Materials   Fibreglass Synthetic moulding material   11
Materials   Foam/sponge - Synthetic   4
Materials   food stuff a substance used or capable of being used as nutriment for human or animal   22
Materials   Fur Fur only refers to animal. Synthetic "fur" is classified as "Plastic - Other."   15
Materials   Glass - Burnt/Opalised    
Materials   glass - optical lens optical lens, could be spectacle lens or projector lens   1
Materials   Glass - Other - Black   2
Materials   Glass - Other - Blue   6
Materials   Glass - Other - Brown   15
Materials   Glass - Other - Clear Glass - Other refers to all non-window glass. The most common type within the category is bottle glass. If bottles are incomplete bases and lips can be of diagnostic value. Further, many bottles are impressed with manufacturing information, which can also provide information about the date of manufacture. The technology of bottle making is fairly closely dated for the early 20th century. Glass colours Allowable colour names are: CLEAR - ranges from completely colourless to bluish or greenish colour. BLUE - ranges from an extremely deep dark blue to light blue. GREEN - ranges from an extremely dark olive green (occasionally described as "black glass") to light sea green or grass green. BROWN - ranges from dark brown to light, and includes amber glass often used in beer bottles. RED - includes red and maroon. PINK. BLACK - includes only truly black pieces. When held up to a strong light some pieces are proved to be brown or dark green. YELLOW - does not include amber. WHITE - refers to opaque white glass ("milk bottle glass"). ORANGE - does not include amber. PURPLE - includes mauve and lavender. MULTICOLOURED - where more than two colours of glass are discernible in an individual piece.   203
Materials   Glass - Other - Frosted/coated   1
Materials   Glass - Other - Green   22
Materials   Glass - Other - Multicoloured   1
Materials   Glass - Other - Orange   4
Materials   Glass - Other - Pink    
Materials   Glass - Other - Purple   5
Materials   Glass - Other - Red   2
Materials   Glass - Other - White   2
Materials   Glass - Other - Yellow    
Materials   Glass - Window (specify colour)    
Materials   Glass - Window - Clear Window glass is of even thickness, is flat on both surfaces and is usually clear in colour.   65
Materials   Graphite Graphite is the form of carbon used in modern pencil "leads" and dry cell batteries.    
Materials   Grass A grass from Scandinavia called saenagras was used in boots, especially finnesko.   1
Materials   Hair   1
Materials   Ivory    
Materials   Leather   123
Materials   Liquid - unidentified   4
Materials   Masonite   1
Materials   Metal - Aluminium Aluminium is a white (silver/grey) coloured metal, which is extremely light, malleable, non- magnetic and resistant to oxidation. It is often found in very thin pieces and in the form of containers or household items.   90
Materials   Metal - Brass   88
Materials   Metal - Composite Metal - Composite refers to objects consisting of components made of different metal types and also composite metals, such as EPNS (electroplate nickel and silver- this is always hallmarked EPNS), and identifiably plated objects. Note: Coins: English and Australian coins made prior to 1945 - silver coloured coins are catalogued as "Metal - Silver," and copper-coloured coins are catalogued as "Metal - Copper - Other." English and Australian coins minted after 1945 are all catalogued as "Metal - Copper - Other."   71
Materials   Metal - Copper Metal -Copper (includes brass and bronze) is a reddish (orange-brown) metal, which is fairly malleable, non-magnetic and has a characteristic blue/green oxidisation. Because it is a good conductor, copper is also commonly used in wires.   36
Materials   Metal - Copper - Nails   6
Materials   Metal - Copper - Other   32
Materials   Metal - Ferrous Metal - Ferrous includes iron and all its alloys, such as steel. Ferrous metals are magnetic to some extent, depending on the presence or absence of non-ferrous plating, etc. Ferrous metals "rust" when exposed to moisture and air, producing a reddish colour. Rust is not magnetic and may greatly reduce the degree of magnetism of a piece. Rust often becomes very thick and obscures the original form of the object.   465
Materials   Metal - Ferrous - Nails   37
Materials   Metal - Ferrous - Other   49
Materials   Metal - Lead Lead is a very heavy, soft metal, whitish-grey in colour, non-magnetic, and easily melted.   10
Materials   Metal - Other Metal - Other (specify) refers to objects made of metals other than those mentioned above, such as zinc, nickel, tin, gold, etc.   124
Materials   Metal - Silver Silver is a lustrous white (silver/grey) coloured precious metal, which has a blackish oxidisation product. Silver is often plated onto other metals. Silver objects are frequently "hallmarked" - imprinted with symbols identifying their composition and date and place of manufacture.   5
Materials   Metal - Tin   23
Materials   Metal - Unidentified Metal - Unidentified is used to describe metal objects of unknown or undiscernible metal type.   212
Materials   Metal - Zinc Zinc   1
Materials   Mortar/Plaster Mortar/Plaster are building materials produced by mixing lime with other materials. They can be coarse to powdery in texture and of variable colour and thickness. Plaster is often painted on its outer surface. Lime mortar can be scratched or broken with a fingernail.   52
Materials   Other Other (specify) refers to all known fabrics not included in the "Materials" list.   40
Materials   Paint Paint is often found in small flakes or as a surface treatment applied to composite objects.   25
Materials   Paper Paper includes all types of paper, such as cardboard, newspaper, etc.   315
Materials   Plastic - Bakelite Bakelite is a very early form of plastic. It is usually dull in colour - cream, maroon, black or brown - without a glossy finish. Bakelite is more brittle than more modern forms of plastic. It is frequently found in the form of electrical fittings and various domestic items.   35
Materials   Plastic - Linoleum   1
Materials   Plastic - Other Plastic - Other includes all forms of synthetic material other than bakelite and linoleum.   167
Materials   Plastic - Perspex type material   6
Materials   Rubber   55
Materials   Scales Scales refers to all fish or reptile scales. They are usually hard, transparent and slightly curved.    
Materials   Seed Seed includes seeds, fruit stones and nut shells    
Materials   Shell - Other Shell - Other includes sea and marine shells, snails, unworked tortoise shell, etc, i.e. all animal shell not showing any evidence of working. This category does not include plant "shells" - these are classified as "Seed."   4
Materials   Shell - Worked Shell -worked refers to worked mother-of-pearl, tortoise shell, etc. Buttons are a common form of worked shell.    
Materials   Skin Skin does not include leather.   3
Materials   Stone Specify, if possible.   33
Materials   Straw   1
Materials   Tar paper Tar paper is a lining material, used as an aid to minimise snow ingress inside the Main Hut to aid in the insulation of the Magnetograph House.   4
Materials   Unidentified Unidentified is used to describe objects of unknown fabric or fabric which cannot be discerned.   12
Materials   Wax   3
Materials   wood Wood used in framing of artworks and photographs   33
Materials   Wood - Charcoal Charcoal is a black and crumbly product of burning wood. A wood grain is often present. It can be distinguished from coal as the latter is hard and shiny.    
Materials   Wood - Other   57
Materials   Wood - plywood   32
Materials   Wood - Worked Wood - worked refers to pieces of wood showing physical signs of working or utilisation. Timber pieces constitute the most common form of worked wood at Cape Denison.   261
Materials   Wool - Fibre   5
Materials   Wool - Fleece   4
Materials   Wool - Textile   27
Materials Description   Bamboo   17
National Estate Register Legal status   Destroyed The place has been destroyed before being assessed or listed.    
National Estate Register Legal status   Duplicate record The place has another record in the database.    
National Estate Register Legal status   Identified The former Australian Heritage Commission has assessed the values of this place and decided that it should be entered in the Register. The place had not reached the Interim List Stage by 1 January 2004 when the Commission was abolished.    
National Estate Register Legal status   Identified through state processes The place is entered in a State/Territory Heritage Register. The Australian Heritage Commission had formally recognised the standards of historic assessment of the relevant State or Territory heritage body and acknowledged that the place has national estate historic values.    
National Estate Register Legal status   Indicative Data provided to or obtained by the Australian Heritage Council or the former Australian Heritage Commission has been entered into the database and the place is at some stage in the assessment process. A decision on whether the place should be entered in the Register has not been made.    
National Estate Register Legal status   Interim list The place was in the Interim list at 1 January 2004 when the Australian Heritage Commission was abolished. The place had been publicly proposed for entry in the Register. Such places will need to undergo the application of the new procedures in the Australian Heritage Council Act 2003, if they are to be entered in the Register.    
National Estate Register Legal status   Registered The place is in the Register of the National Estate. Although some places may be legally registered because they are within a larger registered area they may not necessarily possess intrinsic significance.    
National Estate Register Legal status   Rejected The Australian Heritage Council or the former Australian Heritage Commission has assessed the place and found that it does not warrant entry in the Register in its own right.    
National Estate Register Legal status   Removed from register The place has been removed from the Register.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Assessed place The Council has completed the assessment of the place referred to it by the Minister.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Destroyed place The place has been destroyed before being assessed or listed.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Emergency listing The Minister has been satisfied that the place has one or more National Heritage values and that any one or more of those values is under threat. He has, by instrument published in the Gazette, included the place in the National Heritage List. Such places are subsequently referred to the Council for assessment.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Indicative Place Data provided to or obtained by the Department of the Environment and Heritage, Heritage Division has been entered into the Australian Heritage Database. However, a formal nomination has not been made and the Australian Heritage Council has not received the data necessary for a nomination. The data of the place does not necessarily represent the views of the Council or the Minister.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Listed place The Council has sent an assessment to the Minister and the Minister has entered the place in the National Heritage List. He does this by instrument published in the Gazette.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Ministerial Request for Assessment The Minister or the Minster's delegate has received a request for the emergency listing of a place.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Nominated Place The Minister's delegate has received a nomination on the approved form and carried out an initial assessment on data adequacy. The nomination either will be or has been referred to the Council for assessment. The data will generally be that provided by the nominator, but will be updated during assessment. The significance or values attributed to the place are the views of the nominator and not necessarily those of either the Council or the Minister.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Place not included The Council has sent an assessment to the Minister and the Minister has decided not to include the place in the National Heritage List. This decision will appear on the Internet with the reasons for the decision.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Place rejected for emergency listing The Minister has rejected the request for the emergency listing of a place.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Removed place Either the Minister " has removed the place from the National Heritage List because he is satisfied that the place no longer has any National Heritage values; or, " has decided that it is necessary to do so in the interests of Australia's defence or security.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Request for emergency listing The Minister or the Minster's delegate has received a request for the emergency listing of a place.    
National Heritage List Legal status   Within listed place - any values given in record for listed place This place is within the larger area entered in the National Heritage List. Whilst the place has not been specifically assessed, it may have heritage values. Such values may be identified in the record for the encompassing area.    
Production Method   not applicable    
Protected Place Category 11: Antarctic Historic Site and Monument   Antarctic Historic Site and Monument    
Protected Place Category 11: Antarctic Specially Protected Area   Antarctic Specially Protected Area    
Protected Place Category 11: Commonwealth Heritage Place (Listed)   Commonwealth Heritage Place (Listed)    
Protected Place Category 11: Historic Shipwreck   Historic Shipwreck    
Protected Place Category 11: Indigenous Site   Indigenous Site    
Protected Place Category 11: National Estate   National Estate    
Protected Place Category 11: National Heritage Place   National Heritage Place    
Protected Place Category 11: National Trust   National Trust    
Protected Place Category 11: World Heritage   Woerld Heritage    
Protected Place Category11: Antarctic Specially Managed Area   Antarctic Specially Managed Area    
Protected Place Cetegory 11 Commonwealth Heritage Place (Values Assessed Unlisted)   Commonwealth Heritage Place (Values Assessed Unlisted)    
Significance   Assemblage   21
Significance   Assemblage - artefact scatter   3
Significance   Assemblage - Mawson's cubicle   114
Significance   Assemblage - Workshop    
Significance   Significance The historic, aesthetic, scientific and social values than an object or collection has for past, present or future generations.    
Significance Assemblage   Dark Room   91
Significance ATCM 2001 Resolution 5   Technical or Architectural Artefacts with particular technical or architectural value in the materials, design or method of construction    
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion A: Processes (Historical) The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in the course, or pattern, of Australia's natural or cultural history.   252
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion B: Rarity The place has significant heritage value because of the place's possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of Australia's natural or cultural history.   11
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion C: Research The place has significant heritage value because of the place's potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of Australia's natural or cultural history.   97
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion D: Principal characteristics of a class of places The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of: (i) a class of Australia's natural or cultural places; or (ii) a class of Australia's natural or cultural environments.   11
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion E: Aesthetic The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance in exhibiting particular aesthetic characteristics valued by a community or cultural group.   81
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion F: Creative or technical The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical achievement at a particular period.   63
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion G: Social Value The place has significant heritage value because of the place's strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group for social, cultural or spiritual reasons.   11
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion H: Significant People The place has significant heritage value because of the place's special association with the life or works of a person, or group of persons, of importance in Australia's natural or cultural history.   11
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion I: Indigenous The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance as part of indigenous tradition.   1
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion A: Processes (Historical) The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in the course, or pattern, of Australia's natural or cultural history.   107
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion B: Rarity The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of Australia's natural or cultural history.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion C: Research The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of Australia's natural or cultural history.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion D: Principal characteristics of a class of places The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of: (i) a class of Australia's natural or cultural places; or (ii) a class of Australia's natural or cultural environments.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion E: Aesthetic The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in exhibiting particular aesthetic characteristics valued by a community or cultural group.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion F: Creative or technical The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical achievement at a particular period.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion G: Social Value The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group for social, cultural or spiritual reasons.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion H: Significant People The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's special association with the life or works of a person, or group of persons, of importance in Australia's natural or cultural history.   6
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion I: Indigenous The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance as part of indigenous tradition.   1
Significance PRIMARY   Aesthetic An object may be aesthetically significant for its craftsmanship, style, technical excellence, beauty, demonstration of skill and quality of design and execution. It might include innovative or traditional objects from indigenous or folk cultures or high art. Aesthetically significant objects may be unique or mass produced.   1
Significance PRIMARY   Historic An object or collection may be historically significant for its association with people, events, places and themes. This is the most common category of significance in historical collections. Historically significant objects range from those associated with famous people and important events, to objects of daily life used by ordinary people. They include objects that are typical of particular activities, industries or ways of living. Historically significant items may be mass produced, unique, precious or handmade.   1317
Significance PRIMARY   Scientific or Research An object or collection may have research significance if it has major potential for further scientific examination or study. An object may be of scientific value if it demonstrates the documented distribution, range, variation or habitat of a taxon or taxonomic category, such as species or genus. Archaeological artefacts and collections may have research significance if they are provenanced, and were recovered from a documented context, and if they represent aspects of history that are not well reflected in other sources. This criterion tends to apply chiefly to biological, geological and archaeological material, but may also apply to documentary collections. All biological collections of wild plants or animals, providing they have some data about their provenance, are of some real or potential scientific value, since they contribute to an overall picture of the species, an ecological community, or area biota of a particular locality. Note that objects significant to the history of science or technology should be assessed under the criterion of historical significance, not scientific significance.   18
Significance PRIMARY   Social Objects have social significance if they are held in community esteem. This may be demonstrated by social, spiritual, or cultural expressions that provide evidence of a community's strong affection for an object or collection, and of how it contributes to that community's identity and social cohesion. This evidence can usually be found by consulting people and communities, but it sometimes becomes apparent only when the object is threatened in some way. For example, the social significance of an object is often demonstrated through public debate about its location, conservation or interpretation. Objects may acquire social value with the passage of time and through particular events or activities that demonstrate present-day community esteem. Social significance is only for living, contemporary value; if the value has ceased to exist, it becomes historical significance.   1
Significance SECONDARY   Condition, Intactness and Integrity An object may be significant because it is unusually complete, or in sound, original condition. Objects with these characteristics are said to have integrity. Changes and adaptations made in the working life of an object do not necessarily diminish significance, and , in fact, are also recognised as an integral part of the object and its history.   1
Significance SECONDARY   Interpretive Potential Objects and collections may be significant for their capacity to interpret and demonstrate aspects of experience, historical themes, people and activities. In the hands of a skilled museum worker, most objects have potential to tell their story, and their significance is best described by reference to one or more of the primary criteria. However, there are some circumstances where interpretive potential is a major attribute of an object or collection, or may indeed be the only criterion for which the object is significant. To some extent, interpretive potential represents the value or utility the object has for a museum, as a focus for interpretive and educational programs. It may also be significant for its links to particular collection themes, histories or ways of seeing the collection. Some objects may have very limited significance under the primary criteria, but they still may have some degree of significance for museums for their ability to interpret and illustrate particular themes, people or ideas. This is the case for many humble, unprovenanced social history objects, where the object stands for, or is used as a link to, wider themes or issues. Interpretive potential can be particularly important where certain aspects of history and experience are not well represented in museum collections. Some people's lives are not materially rich or well expressed in the material culture record. In museums their lives or experience may be interpreted though generic objects that have interpretive potential but are otherwise of limited significance.   187
Significance SECONDARY   Provenance Provenance means the chain of ownership and context of use of an object. Knowing this history enables a more precise assessment. Provenance is central to establishing historic and scientific significance. An object may be significant because its provenance - a documented history of its existence, ownership and use - gives it a context in society at large or in the natural world, or in the more personal world of a known individual. Provenance has very particular meaning in some collection areas. Archaeological material should desirably be provenanced to a particular site, and to an exact stratum and location within that site. Archaeological material removed from a site without having had its provenance recorded has little value, unless it has other significance, such as aesthetic. Even then, an object whose archaeological provenance is unknown is diminished in value in the same way as an artwork of doubtful provenance.   2
Significance SECONDARY   Rarity An object may be significant as a rare, unusual or particularly fine example of its type. It is possible for an object's significance to be rated as both rare and representative.   4
Significance SECONDARY   Representativeness An object may be significant because it represents a particular category of object, or activity, way of life or historical theme.   2
Sites   Absolute Magnetic Hut and Surrounds see map   1
Sites   Antarctic Plateau see map   1
Sites   Australian Antarctic Division Headquaters Site of the Australian Antarctic Division Headquaters, 203 Channel Higway, Kingston, Tasmania. 7050   752
Sites   Azimuth Hill see map    
Sites   Boat Harbour see map   1
Sites   Casey Station Region - Commonwealth Heritage Values   17
Sites   Davis Station Gymnasium The original Powerhouse for Davis Station erected during the 1961-62 changoever. The structure served as the principal powerhouse up until 1975 when a new powerhouse was commissioned. From then until 1985 it was used as the Emergency Powerhouse. From 1985 it was used as a diving operations store and then as a Gymnasium. In 2007 the building was demolished and returned to Australia.   2
Sites   Davis Station Office/Cold Porch/Bathroom This structure was built in 1963 to create a short passage between the Sleeping Quarters and the Mess/Kitchen.   1
Sites   Davis Station Old Carpenters Workshop The old carpenter workshop that formed part of the original Davis Station buildings. Erected in 1957 as the first Balloon Hut. Two years later, the structure was superseded by a new Balloon Hut and it was subsequently dismantled and re-erected at the rear of the engine house as the Carpenter's Workshop. In 1962, the carpentry equipment was moved out and the structure was used to store coke, though towards the end of the year it once again was used as the Carpenter's Workshop. An extension was added to the rear of the building in 1974. In 1981 it was converted into a Drying Room and served this purpose until 1992 when the "Old Donga Line' was finally abandoned. It was dismantled and RTA'd in 2007.   2
Sites   Davis Station Old Kitchen and Mess Hut In 1963 a kitchen and mess was built on the site of the old Community Hut between the Sleeping Quarters and the new Powerhouse.   2
Sites   Davis Station Region - Commonwealth Heritage Values   16
Sites   East of Azimuth Hill see map   3
Sites   Heard Island - Commonwealth Heritage Values    
Sites   John O'Groats see map    
Sites   Kingston   164
Sites   Land's End see map    
Sites   Magnetograph House   2
Sites   Magnetograph House and Surrounds see map    
Sites   Magnetograph House and Surrounds see map   1
Sites   Main Hut   20
Sites   Main Hut Exterior and Surrounds - East of Main Hut see map    
Sites   Main Hut Exterior and Surrounds - South of Main Hut see map    
Sites   Main Hut Exterior and Surrounds - West of Main Hut see map    
Sites   Main Hut Exterior and Surrounds- North of Main Hut see map   15
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters Dark Room see plan of Hut   111
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters East verandah see plan of Hut    
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters East wall bunks see plan of Hut   11
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters Kitchen see plan of Hut   22
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters Library see plan of Hut   3
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters Living area see plan of Hut   18
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters Mawson's cubicle see plan of Hut   114
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters Murphy's Bunk Murphys bunk in the first year and location of the wireless in the second year. On the north wall of the Main Hut Living Quarters.   3
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters Platform see plan of Hut   2
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters South verandah see plan of Hut    
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters South wall bunks see plan of Hut    
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters West verandah see plan of Hut    
Sites   Main Hut Living Quarters West wall bunks see plan of Hut   17
Sites   Main Hut Workshop   147
Sites   Main Hut Workshop: Centre see plan of Hut    
Sites   Main Hut Workshop: Collar ties see plan of Hut   1
Sites   Main Hut Workshop: East see plan of Hut    
Sites   Main Hut Workshop: West see plan of Hut   1
Sites   Main Hut Workshop: North see plan of Hut    
Sites   Main Hut Workshop: South see plan of Hut    
Sites   Mawson Station Region - Commonwealth Heritage Values   21
Sites   Memorial Cross    
Sites   Memorial Hill see map    
Sites   North of Beryl Hill see map   3
Sites   Penguin Knob see map   8
Sites   Petrel Hill see map    
Sites   Proclamation Pole, Anemometer Hill see map   1
Sites   Round Lake and Long Lake see map    
Sites   Saddle Point    
Sites   Skua Beach   1
Sites   Station Precinct Macquarie Island - Commonwealth Heritage Values    
Sites   Transit Hut   1
Sites   Transit Hut and Surrounds see map    
Sites   Unprovenanced, Cape Denison see map    
Sites Davis Old Station   Davis Old Station Old Recreation Hut    
Sites Hut Valley   Hut Valley    
World Heritage List Legal status   Declared property The World Heritage Committee has inscribed the property in the World Heritage List.    
World Heritage List Legal status   Declared property - extension nominated The Australian Government has nominated an extension to the area of an already listed property.    
World Heritage List Legal status   Declared property - new values nominated The Australian Government has nominated new values for an already listed property.    
World Heritage List Legal status   Deleted property The property has deteriorated to the point where it has irretrievably lost those characteristics that determined its inclusion. The Committee has informed the State Party and comments have been sought on the deletion. These comments have been taken into account before the final decision has been made.    
World Heritage List Legal status   Endangered property The property has been placed in the World Heritage List In Danger.    
World Heritage List Legal status   Indicative Property Data provided to or obtained by the Department of the Environment and Heritage, Heritage Division has been entered into the Australian Heritage Database. However, a formal nomination has not been made and the Department has not prepared all the data necessary for a nomination.    
World Heritage List Legal status   Nominated property The Australian Government has prepared a nomination for a property in its own Territory and presented it to the World Heritage Committee for assessment. The property is under assessment by the World Heritage Bureau and its associated professional organizations.    
World Heritage List Legal status   Rejected property The World Heritage Committee has decided that the nominated property does not meet the criteria for World Heritage Listing.    
World Heritage List Legal status   Withdrawn property The Australian Government has decided to withdraw its nomination to the World Heritage List.