Keywords

Keywords


Keywords belonging Significance.

List Category Keyword Definition Artefact
count
Significance   Assemblage   21
Significance   Assemblage - artefact scatter   3
Significance   Assemblage - Mawson's cubicle   114
Significance   Assemblage - Workshop    
Significance   Significance The historic, aesthetic, scientific and social values than an object or collection has for past, present or future generations.    
Significance Assemblage   Dark Room   91
Significance ATCM 2001 Resolution 5   Technical or Architectural Artefacts with particular technical or architectural value in the materials, design or method of construction    
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion A: Processes (Historical) The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in the course, or pattern, of Australia's natural or cultural history.   252
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion B: Rarity The place has significant heritage value because of the place's possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of Australia's natural or cultural history.   11
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion C: Research The place has significant heritage value because of the place's potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of Australia's natural or cultural history.   97
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion D: Principal characteristics of a class of places The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of: (i) a class of Australia's natural or cultural places; or (ii) a class of Australia's natural or cultural environments.   11
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion E: Aesthetic The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance in exhibiting particular aesthetic characteristics valued by a community or cultural group.   81
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion F: Creative or technical The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical achievement at a particular period.   63
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion G: Social Value The place has significant heritage value because of the place's strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group for social, cultural or spiritual reasons.   11
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion H: Significant People The place has significant heritage value because of the place's special association with the life or works of a person, or group of persons, of importance in Australia's natural or cultural history.   11
Significance Commonwealth Heritage List   Criterion I: Indigenous The place has significant heritage value because of the place's importance as part of indigenous tradition.   1
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion A: Processes (Historical) The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in the course, or pattern, of Australia's natural or cultural history.   107
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion B: Rarity The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of Australia's natural or cultural history.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion C: Research The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of Australia's natural or cultural history.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion D: Principal characteristics of a class of places The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of: (i) a class of Australia's natural or cultural places; or (ii) a class of Australia's natural or cultural environments.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion E: Aesthetic The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in exhibiting particular aesthetic characteristics valued by a community or cultural group.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion F: Creative or technical The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical achievement at a particular period.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion G: Social Value The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group for social, cultural or spiritual reasons.   3
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion H: Significant People The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's special association with the life or works of a person, or group of persons, of importance in Australia's natural or cultural history.   6
Significance National Heritage List   Criterion I: Indigenous The place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance as part of indigenous tradition.   1
Significance PRIMARY   Aesthetic An object may be aesthetically significant for its craftsmanship, style, technical excellence, beauty, demonstration of skill and quality of design and execution. It might include innovative or traditional objects from indigenous or folk cultures or high art. Aesthetically significant objects may be unique or mass produced.   1
Significance PRIMARY   Historic An object or collection may be historically significant for its association with people, events, places and themes. This is the most common category of significance in historical collections. Historically significant objects range from those associated with famous people and important events, to objects of daily life used by ordinary people. They include objects that are typical of particular activities, industries or ways of living. Historically significant items may be mass produced, unique, precious or handmade.   1317
Significance PRIMARY   Scientific or Research An object or collection may have research significance if it has major potential for further scientific examination or study. An object may be of scientific value if it demonstrates the documented distribution, range, variation or habitat of a taxon or taxonomic category, such as species or genus. Archaeological artefacts and collections may have research significance if they are provenanced, and were recovered from a documented context, and if they represent aspects of history that are not well reflected in other sources. This criterion tends to apply chiefly to biological, geological and archaeological material, but may also apply to documentary collections. All biological collections of wild plants or animals, providing they have some data about their provenance, are of some real or potential scientific value, since they contribute to an overall picture of the species, an ecological community, or area biota of a particular locality. Note that objects significant to the history of science or technology should be assessed under the criterion of historical significance, not scientific significance.   18
Significance PRIMARY   Social Objects have social significance if they are held in community esteem. This may be demonstrated by social, spiritual, or cultural expressions that provide evidence of a community's strong affection for an object or collection, and of how it contributes to that community's identity and social cohesion. This evidence can usually be found by consulting people and communities, but it sometimes becomes apparent only when the object is threatened in some way. For example, the social significance of an object is often demonstrated through public debate about its location, conservation or interpretation. Objects may acquire social value with the passage of time and through particular events or activities that demonstrate present-day community esteem. Social significance is only for living, contemporary value; if the value has ceased to exist, it becomes historical significance.   1
Significance SECONDARY   Condition, Intactness and Integrity An object may be significant because it is unusually complete, or in sound, original condition. Objects with these characteristics are said to have integrity. Changes and adaptations made in the working life of an object do not necessarily diminish significance, and , in fact, are also recognised as an integral part of the object and its history.   1
Significance SECONDARY   Interpretive Potential Objects and collections may be significant for their capacity to interpret and demonstrate aspects of experience, historical themes, people and activities. In the hands of a skilled museum worker, most objects have potential to tell their story, and their significance is best described by reference to one or more of the primary criteria. However, there are some circumstances where interpretive potential is a major attribute of an object or collection, or may indeed be the only criterion for which the object is significant. To some extent, interpretive potential represents the value or utility the object has for a museum, as a focus for interpretive and educational programs. It may also be significant for its links to particular collection themes, histories or ways of seeing the collection. Some objects may have very limited significance under the primary criteria, but they still may have some degree of significance for museums for their ability to interpret and illustrate particular themes, people or ideas. This is the case for many humble, unprovenanced social history objects, where the object stands for, or is used as a link to, wider themes or issues. Interpretive potential can be particularly important where certain aspects of history and experience are not well represented in museum collections. Some people's lives are not materially rich or well expressed in the material culture record. In museums their lives or experience may be interpreted though generic objects that have interpretive potential but are otherwise of limited significance.   187
Significance SECONDARY   Provenance Provenance means the chain of ownership and context of use of an object. Knowing this history enables a more precise assessment. Provenance is central to establishing historic and scientific significance. An object may be significant because its provenance - a documented history of its existence, ownership and use - gives it a context in society at large or in the natural world, or in the more personal world of a known individual. Provenance has very particular meaning in some collection areas. Archaeological material should desirably be provenanced to a particular site, and to an exact stratum and location within that site. Archaeological material removed from a site without having had its provenance recorded has little value, unless it has other significance, such as aesthetic. Even then, an object whose archaeological provenance is unknown is diminished in value in the same way as an artwork of doubtful provenance.   2
Significance SECONDARY   Rarity An object may be significant as a rare, unusual or particularly fine example of its type. It is possible for an object's significance to be rated as both rare and representative.   4
Significance SECONDARY   Representativeness An object may be significant because it represents a particular category of object, or activity, way of life or historical theme.   2